Plaque

Ellie,

I’m curious as usual: Since Plaque is infected biofilm, and Calculus/ tartar is “hardened plaque”, can Closys and Listerine penetrate that hard stuff and reach the imbedded bacteria and/ or does the bacteria migrate out of the calculus to try to eat the xylitol and die that way or does the bacteria live only on the surface of the “hardened plaque” ?

P

Hi P,

I don’t know exactly but I suspect the bacteria die off as the calculus hardens up.
It is quite possible that new bacteria form on the outside of the crusty and hard stuff and that these will die off as they are exposed to xylitol.

As we said before:
Healthy teeth are covered by a thin, invisible biofilm layer that is created out of proteins in saliva. This layer only thickens and becomes plaque when it is infected by Strep.mutans.
When minerals deposit in this plaque layer it turns into calculus.

As you see, without bacteria you will not get plaque, and without plaque you will not get calculus! Ha! Then YOU win the game!

Ellie

ellie@zellies.com

26 Corporate Woods
Rochester, NY 14623



Categories: Plaque

Tags: ,

2 replies

  1. Healthy teeth are covered by a thin, invisible biofilm layer that is created out of proteins in saliva. This layer only thickens and becomes plaque when it is infected by Strep.mutans."Paleo" enthusiasts say hunter-gather peoples, who do not brush their teeth, typically have excellent dental health. If a biofilm on the teeth is normal and desirable (while uninfected), then wouldn't it be better, once control has been established, NOT to brush routinely?

  2. Hi there, I wish I knew the exact answer to your question. From what I read I think you may be right! I actually believe dental problems originated from toothbrushes! In the late 18th century the first toothbrush was made by a British gentleman, William Addis of Clerkenald, England – using pigs bristles. I know everybody blames sugar, but I believe this toothbrush may have been the vehicle that began our dental problems.Apparently most Americans did not brush their teeth until the Army enforced the habit for soldiers during World War II. Was there less tooth decay before or after this? Many tribes in undeveloped countries have good teeth, and use sticks to clean their teeth. Ancient Chinese and Native Americans used sticks from birch trees to clean their teeth! Perhaps we need to massage our gums for optimal oral health? Before you quote me on this — remember we need a perfect world! No coffee, soda, oranges, or stress – necessary to go along with the lifestyle!I really don't know the answer! But like general health, I believe it's about balance, and developing a strong, healthy, oral ecology to protect us. Thanks for an excellent question — let's keep our eyes open, our minds alert and discover more about the history of dental disease! Best wishes,Ellie http://www.zellies.com26 Corporate WoodsRochester, NY 14623

Leave a Reply or Ask a Question

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: